A Journey of a Thousand Backwards Steps

Recently I visited my dad in his memory care facility. Dad has been at his current home for a while. He is getting less and less communicative and even responsive. At this last visit, neither of us got much comfort out of face to face time, so I stood behind him, gently massaging his back and neck. I remembered when my brother and I were little, and giving dad karate chop massages was a regular art of our afer dinner shenanigans. This felt different, of course, but you cling to associations.

Nearby, a man was visiting a woman, his wife, I later learned. I hadn’t seen either of them before, and it quickly became clear that she was a very new resident.  He was worried about her. You could tell he had been her caretaker and felt somewhat adrift.

He had brought her a toy, he told the attendant. He thought she might like it. It was a stuffed animal she’d always had on their bed. The attendant smiled kindly, admired it, and gently advised he put her name on it.

He hadn’t yet learned that objects grow legs in an Alzheimer’s ward, as everything looks both familiar and foreign to the residents.

He mentioned that she needed a bath. He said “I don’t know if she’ll mention it.”

The wife sat quietly, perhaps asleep. She clearly would never again remind someone of her hygiene needs. She was limp — except for the pillows the attendant had used to prop her up. Said she seemed to like that.

The attendant said his wife had eaten a good breakfast. That seemed to take one worry line out of his forehead.

Until he realized, and my heart wrenched with his as he quietly said, “The last thing we did together was eat supper.”

Becasue even though she was still alive, their relationship, as he knew it, died the morning he moved her to the memory care unit. I saw this as my mom must have, and remembered the pain in her voice, and even in her posture. The guilt, the certain surety that she had failed him as a wife. I knew he felt this way now.

“I don’t know what to bring for her,” he said.

“Just a little bit at a time,” the attendant softly responded.

“Maybe I’ll put some butterflies up on her wall,” he said, to himself mostly, all the while patting her hair, adjusting her blanket, caressing her hand.

From where I stood, one wheelchair over but trying to give them privac, I saw an older couple, a man bereft and a woman sliding into her own end, one forgotten memory at a time.

But from his vantage point he saw the young woman he had romanced, who had made his home nice, whom he now wanted to repay in kind.

I cried in the parking lot when I left, thinking of my parents. Of me and my husband. Of my daughter’s face as she asks me if she, too, will someday be like Grandpa. I, of course, can’t answer her.

I can only hope she always has someone who wants to put butterflies on her wall.

About DonniT

Born in Georgia, raised in California, and living in Minnesota for almost 2 decades, I have lots of different ways of looking at the world. Married to my college sweetheart, surviving being a Navy Mom to Sailor Boy and helping Singer Girl achieve her dreams of college and stardom. Constantly trying to outwit my Labradoodle while rescuing dogs. Love to read, shop, entertain, volunteer, travel, plan, and dream!

Posted on September 5, 2019, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Oh, Donni. I teared up reading this. I think about you & Wayne and how hard this is for both of you. I love you & cherish our friendship.

  2. Beautiful Donni. ❤️

  3. Thanks Kel. Means a lot!

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