A New Chapter

The last time I wrote in this blog, I was married to the love of my life.

Now, I am a widow.

I still wear a ring, but he doesn’t.

My life is a new marriage of sorts. I must weave the before with the after. I sit at his desk, in what was previously his office, dividing my time between reconciling the past and preparing for the future. Simultaneously I must settle his affairs while making sure my own are ready for future days. I spend a little bit of time every day working through legal documents, finagling various types of insurance, and preparing for taxes. I am the chief cook and bottle washer now.

This blog will probably have a haphazard appearance (not that it was very ordered before, TBH), as I strive to cover a varied terrain.

I will write about the last vacation we took before we knew he was sick and talk about my own solo travels. As I write this, I have just arrived from a one week beach vacation where I mourned and healed. In fact, I have several trips coming up this year. Last year we had but one: our last Vegas adventure. I’ll have to write about that, too, I guess. I have a lot of leg stretching to catch up on this year.

I will blog about his celebration of life party, and about the hell of watching someone die by degrees. Of watching the man who used to hold you up become the one you must support. I went from being a friend and a lover to a nursemaid. It sucked, but I am not alone. In fact, I now have 90-some thousand new friends walking my widow journey with me. I decided before he died that I would need a way to keep myself accountable. So I created a TikTok grief journal, and every day I post something. Some days are decidedly more interesting than others. Some posts show me drowning in grief, while others show me making new strokes forward in the ocean of possibilities. I’d love to have you follow me, and help me stay the course!

We’ve all heard that the first year is the hardest, although now I’ve been told it is actually harder in year 2, when the new loss becomes the new normal. But I need to get through year one first, one post at a time.

Grieving is something that takes place on a sliding scale. For me, that process really started October 1, 2021, when we first heard the words “You have ALS.” I can still remember everything about that. I dropped him of at the entry to the University of Minnesota Neurology department, and watched him limp inside, leaning heavily on his late father’s walking stick. I parked the car, then found him. Our roles had already changed. In the waiting room we were both casually terrified, trying not to look outwardly concerned. I think he was more worried than I was, which makes sense. I think he already knew the diagnosis. I was living on edge in the dark, impatiently waiting for someone to tell us he did NOT have that hideous disease, .

Once in the exam room, the doctor had clearly read through the myriad reports from other doctors, and had analyzed the test results. Rich sat on the exam table, while the doctor checked his reflexes. It seemed to take him less than a minute to declare Rich’s death sentence, but I am sure it was longer than that. I was sitting in the spare chair they always have in an exam room. I know it was just maybe 5 feet away, but the doctor’s words sucked all the air out of the room and I felt as unsteady on my feet as Rich had been for months when I lurched up and crossed to the exam table. I put my hand n his shoulder, but that wasn’t enough. I needed more. I pressed up against him, and clutched his leg, trying not to hold too tightly or breathe too loudly. In the few steps it took me to cross that increasingly claustrophobic room, I had a million conversations with myself. I transitioned from panic and sorrow to determination and caring, because that was now my job. I needed to be what he needed, whatever that was, and my own needs had to be put aside.

Now it is time, once again, to tend to my needs.

Slowly, the world we built for two has become a universe of one.

I still make the king sized bed, but only have to wash the pillowcases on one side.

His clothes, now donated, are hopefully bringing someone else a smidge of the confidence he had, and I have started spreading out in the closet, reorganizing my things to suit my new lifestyle.

When Rich was first diagnosed, we had two cars in the garage. Then three, when our daughter came home home for one last summer with her dad. Then two, when we sold his car. Then three again when we bought the wheelchair van. Then two, when she went to school. Then one, when I sold the van. My car now also lives alone.

It seems every week I rearrange a drawer or a closet. I feel like I am marking my territory, by making things work in my new normal. It is also a way of visiting with him on a small scale, as I run across something of his, whether it is a business card or a pair of swim goggles or a tool he never put away in the right place. I fear, and hope, it will be a long time before the last item is discovered. Like an archeologist, I will be unearthing bits of his life for years to come.

And every day, I unearth a bit more of my life. My new life. My widowed life. My rebuilding life. My strong, sad, capable, terrified, hopeful life.

I can do this. With the continued support and help from all of you, I will do this.

About DonniT

Born in Georgia, raised in California, and living in Minnesota for almost 2 decades, I have lots of different ways of looking at the world. Married to my college sweetheart, surviving being a Navy Mom to Sailor Boy and helping Singer Girl achieve her dreams of college and stardom. Constantly trying to outwit my Labradoodle while rescuing dogs. Love to read, shop, entertain, volunteer, travel, plan, and dream!

Posted on January 22, 2023, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 8 Comments.

  1. Oh Donni. I can feel your pa

  2. Hugs to you Donni.

  3. Donni, you never cease to Amaze me. Sending hugs!😘

  4. Michelle Hitchcock

    Love and hugs to you my friend.

  5. Hugs, my dear. Grief is certainly a journey.

  6. Patricia Reider

    You express so well te inexpressible. ❤️

  7. Donni….I think about you SO often….your words always have painful, yet loving clarity….. I wish you peace this year, even in bits and pieces….. A friend sent me a quote this week…. in caring for my mother, I try to fill my dark spaces with whatever brings slivers of light and love….because I too know I am loved and supported…. Somehow, your words here seem to resonate with the great Ralph Waldo Emerson: ” Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.” I would love to have our paths cross this year….. until then, I send you daily love!

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